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2000 census, counting under adversity

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Published by National Academies Press in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • United States -- Census, 22nd, 2000,
  • United States -- Census, 22nd, 2000 -- Evaluation

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementPanel to Review the 2000 Census ; Constance F. Citro, Daniel L. Cork, and Janet L. Norwood, editors ; Committee on National Statistics, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Edcation, National Research Council of the National Academies.
GenreCensus, 22nd, 2000.
ContributionsCitro, Constance F. 1942-, Cork, Daniel L., Norwood, Janet Lippe.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHA201.12 .N38 2004
The Physical Object
Paginationxxvi, 595 p. ;
Number of Pages595
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3313707M
ISBN 100309091411, 0309529980
LC Control Number2004102206
OCLC/WorldCa55032970

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The Census: Counting Under Adversity will be an invaluable resource for users of the data and for policymakers and census planners. It provides a trove of information about the issues that have fueled debate about the census process and about the operations and quality of the nation’s twenty-second decennial enumeration. Get this from a library! The census, counting under adversity. [Constance F Citro; Daniel L Cork; Janet L Norwood; National Research Council (U.S.). Panel to Review the Census.] -- "The decennial census is the federal government's largest and most complex peacetime operation. This report of a panel of the National Research Council's Committee on National Statistics. The census marked a radical departure from past practices in the collection of racial data. Specifically, the census is the first major implementation of revised guidelines for the collection of racial and ethnic data issued by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The Census: Counting Under Adversity Problems arose in the execution of the census, but the count was generally well done, says a report by the National Research Council of the National Academies. The findings in the report cover the planning process for , major innovations in census operations, the completeness of population.

The Census: Counting Under Adversity, a report of the Panel to Review the Census, Constance F. Citro, Daniel L. Cork, and Janet L. Norwood, eds., National Research Council of the National Academies, The National Academies Press, Washington, DC, Census Catalog - Order products on-line Evaluations - Results from the Census Testing, Experimentation, and Evaluation Program Special Tabulations - Program for obtaining custom data tabulations Count Question Resolution - Program for challenging Census counts Notes and Errata [PDF m] - Includes geography and data corrections.   Counting Americans is a social history exploring the political stakes that pitted various interests and groups of people against each other as population categories were constantly redefined. Utilizing new archival material from the Census Bureau, this study pays needed attention to the long arc of contested changes in race and census-making. The decennial census was the federal government’s largest and most complex peacetime operation. This report of a panel of the National Research Council’s Committee on National Statistics comprehensively reviews the conduct of the census and the quality of the resulting panel’s findings cover the planning process for , which was marked by an atmosphere of.

  The County and City Data Book (CCDB) is a convenient summary of statistics on the social and economic structure of the counties and cities of the United States. It is designed to serve as a statistical reference and guide to other data publications and sources. The latter function is served by the source citations appearing below each table and in Appendix A, Source Notes and Explanations. A census of the type of Census has been taken every ten years since the first census in Such a census has been thought to be necessary for over two hundred years. There is no basis for holding that it is not necessary in the year ". Race, Class, and the Census for By Hodgkinson, Harold L Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 77, No. 2, October Read preview Overview Counting the Counters: Effects of Census on Employment By Kelter, Laura A Monthly Labor Review, Vol. , No. 2, February When its history [of the Census] is written, the issues surrounding sampling and other aspects of measurement theory will be a footnote to the real story of this count: multiracial identity. With "Question 8: What is this person's race? Mark one or more," we turned a .