Foreign know-how, firm control, and the income of developing countries
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Foreign know-how, firm control, and the income of developing countries

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Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Intellectual capital -- Management,
  • Knowledge management,
  • Intellectual capital -- Developing countries

Book details:

About the Edition

Managerial know-how shapes the productivity of firms by defining the set of available technologies, production choices, and market opportunities. This know-how can be reallocated across countries as managers acquire control of factors of production abroad. In this paper, we construct a quantitative model of cross-country income differences to study the aggregate consequences of international mobility of managerial know-how. We use the model and aggregate data to infer the relative scarcity of this form of know-how for a sample of developing countries. We also conduct policy counterfactuals and find that on average, developing countries gain up to 23% in output and 9% in consumption when they eliminate all barriers to foreign control of domestic factors of production.

Edition Notes

StatementAriel Burstein, Alexander Monge-Naranjo.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 13073., Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 13073.
ContributionsMonge-Naranjo, Alexander., National Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination41, [9] p. :
Number of Pages41
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17633858M
OCLC/WorldCa137302354

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Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries * Article (PDF Available) in Quarterly Journal of Economics (1) February . Get this from a library! Foreign know-how, firm control, and the income of developing countries. [Ariel T Burstein; Alexander Monge-Naranjo; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- Managerial know-how shapes the productivity of firms by defining the set of available technologies, production choices, and market opportunities. This know-how can be reallocated across countries as. Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries ∗ Ariel Burstein UCLA and NBER Alexander Monge-Naranjo Northwestern University March Abstract Managerial know-how shapes the productivity of firms by defining the set of avail-able technologies, production choices, and market opportunities. This know-how can. Using aggregate data, we infer the relative scarcity of this form of know-how in a sample of developing countries. We find that developing countries gain, on average, 12 % in output and 5 % in welfare (with wide variation across countries) when they eliminate policy barriers to foreign control of domestic factors of production.

Ariel T. Burstein & Alexander Monge-Naranjo, "Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. (1), pages FOREIGN KNOW-HOW, FIRM CONTROL, AND THE INCOME OF DEVELOPING COUNTRIES* Ariel T. Burstein and Alexander Monge-Naranjo Management know-how shapes the productivity of firms and can be reallo-cated across countries as managers acquire control of factors of production abroad. Using aggregate data, we infer the relative scarcity of this form of know-how in a sample of developing countries. We find that developing countries gain, on average, 12 % in output and 5 % in welfare (with wide variation across countries) when they eliminate policy barriers to foreign control of domestic factors of production. I. reallocation of management know-how. Using aggregate data, we infer the relative scarcity of this form of know-how in a sample of developing countries. Wefind that developing countries gain, on average, 12% in output and 5% in welfare (with wide variation across countries) when they eliminate policy barriers to foreign control of.

Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries Article (PDF Available) January with 40 Reads How we measure 'reads'. FOREIGN KNOW-HOW, FIRM CONTROL, AND THE INCOME OF DEVELOPING COUNTRIES. By Ariel T. Burstein and Alexander Monge-Naranjo. Abstract. Management know-how shapes the productivity of firms, and can be reallocated across countries as managers acquire control of factors of production abroad. We construct a quantitative model to investigate the. Get this from a library! Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries. [Ariel Burstein; Alexander Monge-Naranjo] -- Managerial know-how shapes the productivity of firms by defining the set of available technologies, production choices, and market opportunities. This know-how can be reallocated across countries as. Foreign Know-How, Firm Control, and the Income of Developing Countries. By Ariel Burstein and Alexander Monge-Naranjo. Download PDF ( KB) Abstract. Managerial know-how shapes the productivity of firms by defining the set of available technologies, production choices, and .